ARE VOLCANOES INACTIVE FOR MORE THAN 10,000 YEARS EXPECTED TO ERUPT?

Accordingly to ZetaTalk @ http://www.zetatalk.com/poleshft/p120.htm, the answer is confused. First, it says all volcanoes will explode because of the severity of the poleshift (during the shift). Then, in the November 16, 2002 note, it states that "all volcanoes active within the last 10,000 years can be considered candidates to blow, or ooze during the shift." So, which is it?

Here's an example of a volcano inactive for 11,000 years coming back to life: http://beforeitsnews.com/earthquakes/2012/10/plumes-from-volcano-at-usmexico-border-last-eruption-11000-years-ago-2445660.html. Notice that it says that the volcanoes in that area have been erupting sporadically for four million years. Another one is Four-peaked Volcano in Alaska. It erupted in 2007 after being thought to be inactive for over 10,000 years: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inactive_volcano#Scientific_classification_of_volcanoes. That article goes on to say: "... whether a volcano is truly extinct is often difficult to determine. Since "supervolcano" calderas can have eruptive lifespans sometimes measured in millions of years, a caldera that has not produced an eruption in tens of thousands of years is likely to be considered dormant instead of extinct."

Recently, the island of Hong Kong was discovered to be an extinct supervolcano: http://blogs.wsj.com/chinarealtime/2012/08/31/hong-kong-discovers-140-million-year-old-supervolcano/.

From the confusing way Zetatalk has stated their information, it seems prudent to just stay away from any known volcano, if possible.

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